London's Pulse: Medical Officer of Health reports 1848-1972

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Port of London 1912

Report for the year ended 31st December 1912 of the Medical Officer of Health for the Port of London

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London were notified to the Medical Officers of Health of the respective districts in
which they were to reside, so that they could be visited if deemed desirable and the fact
ascertained that they were in good health. So far as I know, no other cases occurred.
The s.s. "Maloja," of Belfast, 132,012, arrived at Gravesend on the 28th January,
1912, from Bombay, having landed a case suspicious of Small-pox at Marseilles on the
13th January. On arrival of the vessel at Gravesend all names and addresses of
passengers and crew were taken and notified to the respective Medical Officers of Health.
The vessel and effects were thoroughly disinfected by this Authority. No further cases
occurred.
The s.s. "Mooltan," of Greenock, 117,397, arrived at Gravesend on the
10th February from Auckland, having landed two cases of Small-pox at Suez.
The vessel and effects were disinfected at Suez. On the 12th February one of the crew
(a fireman) was taken ill and found to be suffering with Small-pox. He was
admitted to the Port Sanitary Hospital at Denton. All necessary disinfection was
carried out by this Authority, and all persons on board kept under daily observation
during the vessel's stay in the Port. The names and addresses of the passengers and
crew leaving the vessel were notified to the respective Medical Officers of Health.
The s.s. "Ajax," of Liverpool, 113,395, arrived on the 21st March from Yokohama,
having had 11 cases of Small-pox (one death) on board. These were landed at Penang.
All necessary disinfection was carried out at Singapore and Penang.
Among the cargo were the effects of a person who had died from Small-pox in
Bangkok. There was no evidence that they had been disinfected, so they were removed
to Denton Hospital for disinfection as a precautionary measure before handing them over
to the friends of the deceased.
With reference to the s.s. "Mooltan," of Greenock, 117,397, which arrived on the
10th February, having landed two cases of Small-pox at Suez (see above), I received
information on the 27th February that a native on this vessel, lying in Tilbury Dock,
was ill. On an examination, the disease was found to be very suspicious, and the
patient was removed to Denton Hospital, where he was subsequently found to be
suffering from Small-pox.
The crew's quarters on this vessel were thoroughly fumigated, and afterwards
painted.
No further cases occurred. The vessel sailed for Bombay on March 1st.
The s.s. "Colaba," of Glasgow, 121,287, arrived at Gravesend on the 23rd March,
1912, from Calcutta. One of the crew (a Native servant) was admitted to the Seamen's
Hocpital, Greenwich, on the 25th March suffering with "Syphilis," and subsequently
removed thence to the Metropolitan Asylums Board's hospital, where the disease was
diagnosed as Small-pox. All necessary disinfection was carried out by this Authority,
and the addresses of the persons leaving the ship were notified to the respective Medical
Officers of Health. On the 1st April, however, I received information that the case
ultimately turned out to be not Small-pox.
On the 29th March, 1912, I received information that a man returned from
Santander to Glasgow in the s.s. "Saxone," travelled to Leith by train, and then
proceeded in the s.s. "Fiona" to London. On arrival in London he proceeded to a


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